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1995 FIA Formula One World Championship season
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Index: Races by country | Races by season

The 1995 Formula One season was the 46th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1995 FIA Formula One World Championship, which was contested over 17 races from March 26 to November 12, 1995. For the second year in succession, the Drivers' Championship was won by Michael Schumacher, the Benetton driver defeating Damon Hill of Williams by 33 points. Benetton-Renault won the Constructors' Championship, defeating Williams-Renault by 29 points.

The season was highlighted by the rivalry between Schumacher and Hill, with Schumacher winning nine races and Hill winning four races. Benetton and Williams drivers dominated the field, victorious in all but one race, the Canadian GP won by Jean Alesi in a Ferrari. During the season, Ferrari proved to be competitive in most races but poor reliability prevented both drivers and team challenging for the championship. Jean Alesi, Johnny Herbert (Benetton Renault) and David Coulthard (Williams Renault) all won their first races in F1.

Background Edit

The calendar was initially announced at the beginning of 1995, with the European Grand Prix now at the Nürburgring circuit. The Argentine Grand Prix was the only newly announced race, with it taking place at the Autódromo Oscar Alfredo Gálvez circuit. The circuit was due to kick off the calendar on March 12, but there were doubts over whether the circuit would be ready in time. There were also doubts over round two at Brazil, with the previous year's death of Ayrton Senna hitting Brazil motorsport very hard. The third race in Japan was also under threat, as it was due to take place at the TI Circuit. However, the circuit was badly affected after the Great Hanshin earthquake, which hit the local infrastructure hard. The San Marino round, Spanish round and the Italian round were also under threat, with safety works taking place and the Circuit de Catalunya in financial difficulty.[1] On February 6, a revised calendar was announced, with the Argentine Grand Prix moved to April 9, despite the fact it had now received official clearance from FIA safety inspector Roland Bruynseraede. The Pacific round was moved due to the Kobe earthquake, with it now one week before the Japanese Grand Prix. The European Grand Prix was moved forward seven days, leaving just a seven day gap between the Portuguese and European rounds. However, some tracks still needed clearance to race.[2]

Although 14 teams and 28 drivers respectively were on the official 1995 entry list, the Larrousse team with drivers Éric Bernard and Christophe Bouchut never turned up at the circuit for any of the on-track sessions.[3][4] This was due to the team running short of money: in the period prior to the event, with French government aid not forthcoming and a 1995 chassis not yet built, team owner Gérard Larrousse elected to miss the first two rounds of the season in the hope of competing from the San Marino Grand Prix onwards.[5] No funding ever arrived and it was too late for them to build a car for the season.[6] There were some arrangements with the DAMS Formula 3000 team, but DAMS bosses wanted to buy Larrousse and run the team themselves.[7] However, on February 13, the boss of DAMS, Jean-Paul Driot announced that they had abandoned plans to enter Formula One for 1995, as he could not find a good amount of sponsorship to run the team at a competitive level. Driot said he intended to return to Formula 3000 and prepare for an F1 bid in 1996.[8] Larrousse's withdrawal, in addition to the collapse of the Lotus team after the end of the 1994 season, dropped the number of participating cars to 26, guaranteeing all the entrants of a race start, without the threat of failing to qualify, for the first time since the 1994 Canadian Grand Prix. The threat of a drivers' boycott over the terms of their 1995 Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) Super Licences, which allowed the FIA to demand promotional appearances and forbade the drivers from criticising the championship, was defused by the governing body prior to the race, ensuring full driver participation.[9][10]

Of the teams that did appear, all had completely new chassis to cope with the revised Technical Regulations, which stipulated a variety of changes including the reduction of engine capacity and the size of aerodynamic wings, the introduction of more stringent crash testing, the raising of the cars' ride height, and more rigorous testing of fuel specifications all with the aim of reducing speeds and increasing driver safety, a process which had begun in the aftermath of the deaths of Roland Ratzenberger and Ayrton Senna during the weekend of the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix.[11] The cars were still in various stages of development heading into the new season; the Footwork FA16 and Simtek S951 chassis arrived at the event with virtually no testing, having been completed shortly beforehand.[9][12] There was one new team in the shape of the Italian Forti outfit, whilst the Benetton, McLaren, Footwork, Jordan, Pacific, Ligier and Sauber teams had all changed their engine suppliers in the course of the off-season.[11][13] Of the initial 1995 drivers, Pedro Diniz was the only complete rookie, whilst Andrea Montermini started his first race after failing to qualify for the 1994 Spanish Grand Prix due to injury. Mika Salo and Domenico Schiattarella had competed in two races, with Taki Inoue competing in one race the previous season.

Minardi had been expected to run with Mugen-Honda engines, but at the last minute, Ligier boss Flavio Briatore persuaded the Japanese engine supplier to supply Ligier, leaving Minardi in a mess. Their car was designed for the Honda V10 and parts were already being made. The Minardi team had to work flat out to build a brand new car with a Ford ED engine. Team owner Giancarlo Minardi announced he was taking legal action against the Japanese supplier.[14] The status of Ligier and who its owners were was coming under scrutiny. The news that Martin Brundle had signed with them for 1995 brought up rumours that Tom Walkinshaw was the new boss of the team. Walkinshaw's move to Ligier from Benetton (where he had been Benetton's Engineering Director[13]) was part of the deal between Flavio Briatore and FIA's Max Mosley the previous year to get Benetton off the hook for the use of an illegal fuel filter in the 1994 German Grand Prix. Benetton admitted that the filter was illegal and was let off, on the understanding that major changes would be made within the team. Briatore appeared to have asked Walkinshaw to control Ligier.[15] Controversy surrounded the Ligier JS41 car, with rival team owners comparing it to the Benetton B195 car because of their similar design, the only apparent difference being the engine in each car.[16] Commenting on the design similarities, Walkinshaw said:

Template:Quote


At the front of the field, Michael Schumacher and Damon Hill in the Benetton and Williams cars respectively were the favourites to battle for the Drivers' Championship, with Schumacher anticipating a "struggle" for the championship.[17] Bernard Dudot, Renault Sport's Chief Engineer, said that he believed Benetton was less well-prepared than Williams, as the former team had changed its engine supplier to Renault, whereas Williams had been in partnership with the company since 1989.[18]

McLaren were also concerned about the standard refuelling equipment provided for 1995 by suppliers Intertechnique, having suffered a major leak in a test of the new rig outside of its factory. Intertechnique had redesigned the fuel equipment, which was used by all of the teams, in the wake of a pit lane fire suffered by driver Jos Verstappen during the previous year's German Grand Prix.[9] The new fuel rigs, in addition to being half the size of the 1994, also featured longer nozzles, and were designed to lock onto the car before any fuel could begin to flow.[19] Intertechnique traced the problem to a fault valve within the equipment, which caused 10 kg (22 lbs.) of fuel to leak, and modified the parts accordingly.[20] It was only the seventeenth race since refuelling had been reintroduced to the sport at the start of the 1994 season.

Another rule revision meant that the minimum weight limit of 595 kg (1,309 lbs.) applied to both car and driver together. Prior to the first session of the season, all of the drivers were weighed to establish a reference weight to be used on occasions when the two were weighed separately, or if the driver was unavailable to be weighed. As such, a small competitive advantage could be established if the driver attempted to register a weight as heavy as possible, so their actual weight when driving the car would be lower.[13]

Season review Edit

The 1995 F1 Season featured several dramatic incidents, including seven Grands Prix affected by rain and 4 Grands Prix were red-flagged on the first lap of the race.

The Formula One regulations changed prior to the 1995 season. The most significant change was the to the engine capacity. This was reduced from 3.5 Litres to 3.0 Litres, in order to reduce speeds. All of the cars were fitted with cockpit side protection, and the cockpit opening was made larger than the 1994-spec cars. The front and rear wings were modified to reduce downforce, thereby reducing cornering speeds. These changes were in reaction to the deaths of Roland Ratzenberger and Ayrton Senna at the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix, who both died of head and neck injuries. Some of the F1 circuits were changed, with larger run-off areas featuring at tracks such as Monza and Imola.

The Benetton team had Renault engines for the first time, after running Ford V8s for several years. Michael Schumacher won nine out of the seventeen Grands Prix, and won his second World Championship. Schumacher's main title rival was Damon Hill, who was driving for Williams-Renault. Hill and Schumacher were involved in some very close battles at numerous races, including at the 1995 Belgian Grand Prix, where the two championship contenders fought wheel-to-wheel for extended periods.

Damon Hill received criticism during 1995, after several incidents that were attributed to driving errors. The 1995 British Grand Prix was overshadowed by a controversial collision between Hill and Schumacher, and Hill was widely blamed for the accident. Hill also suffered with mechanical problems in his Williams-Renault.

Jean Alesi won the 1995 Canadian Grand Prix, which was his first and only victory in Formula One. Alesi also nearly won the European and Japanese Grand Prix, only being passed by Schumacher with a few laps to go in the former, and retiring with a driveshaft bearing failure in the latter.

Nigel Mansell made a brief return to Formula One with McLaren. The McLaren-Mercedes cockpit was initially too small for Mansell, and he had to miss the first two races whilst McLaren redesigned the monocoque. His eventual return for the 1995 San Marino Grand Prix was disappointing, and he was outpaced by Häkkinen. After another disappointing race at the Spanish Grand Prix Mansell and McLaren parted ways, and Mark Blundell drove the second McLaren for the remainder of 1995. Mika Häkkinen was seriously injured in a crash during practice for the 1995 Australian Grand Prix. The fast actions of the medical crew, including performing an emergency tracheotomy, saved his life, and he later returned to the track in 1996.[21] Later that year, Mansell revealed that he intended to "fight for the championship with Williams", but the Williams team chose David Coulthard instead.

One of the rookies for 1995 was Taki Inoue who drove for Footwork Arrows. During First Qualifying for the 1995 Monaco Grand Prix his car stalled on the track, and the session was stopped in order to recover the car. A course car driven by Jean Ragnotti was travelling too fast and Ragnotti was unsighted by the barriers on the twisty circuit. Ragnotti's car crashed into Inoue's stranded car, flipping the Arrows. Inoue was knocked unconscious but he recovered and took part in the race on Sunday. At the 1995 Hungarian Grand Prix Inoue's car retired with a mechanical problem. He got out of his car and grabbed a fire extinguisher in order to put out a small fire on his car. Inoue then walked into the path of a course car, and was knocked over. Inoue bounced off the front of the car and collapsed on to the grass. He suffered minor leg injuries.

Drivers and constructorsEdit

The following teams and drivers competed in the 1995 FIA Formula One World Championship.[22]

Entrant Constructor Chassis Engine Tyre No Driver Rounds Test driver(s)
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Mild Seven Benetton Renault Benetton B195 Renault RS7 3.0 V10 G 1 Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher All 22px-Flag of France Emmanuel Collard[23] 22px-Flag of the Netherlands Jos Verstappen
2 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Johnny Herbert All
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Nokia Tyrrell Yamaha Tyrrell 023 Yamaha OX10C 3.0 V10 G 3 Flag-of-japansmall Ukyo Katayama 1–13, 15–17 22px-Flag of Italy Gabriele Tarquini[24]
22px-Flag of Italy Gabriele Tarquini 14
4 22px-Flag of Finland Mika Salo All
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Rothmans Williams Renault Williams FW17
FW17B
Renault RS7 3.0 V10 G 5 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill All 22px-Flag of France Jean-Christophe Boullion[23]
20px-Flag of Switzerland Alain Menu
6 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom David Coulthard All
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Marlboro McLaren Mercedes McLaren MP4/10
MP4/10B
MP4/10C
Mercedes FO 110 3.0 V10 G 7 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Mark Blundell 1–2, 5–17 22px-Flag of Denmark Jan Magnussen[22]
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Mark Blundell[23]
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Nigel Mansell 3–4
8 22px-Flag of Finland Mika Häkkinen 1–14, 16–17
22px-Flag of Denmark Jan Magnussen 15
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Footwork Hart Footwork FA16 Hart 830 3.0 V8 G 9 22px-Flag of Italy Gianni Morbidelli 1–7, 15–17 n/a
22px-Flag of Italy Max Papis 8–14
10 Flag-of-japansmall Taki Inoue All
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom MTV Simtek FordTemplate:Ref Simtek S951 Ford EDB 3.0 V8 G 11 22px-Flag of Italy Domenico Schiattarella 1–5 Flag-of-japansmall Hideki Noda[23]
12 22px-Flag of the Netherlands Jos Verstappen 1–5
22px-Flag of Ireland Total Jordan Peugeot
22px-Flag of Ireland B&H Total Jordan Peugeot
Jordan 195 Peugeot A10 3.0 V10 G 14 25px-Brazilflag Rubens Barrichello All n/a
15 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Eddie Irvine All
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Pacific Grand Prix Ltd Pacific PR02 Ford EDC 3.0 V8 G 16 22px-Flag of France Bertrand Gachot 1–8, 15–17 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Oliver Gavin
22px-Flag of Italy Giovanni Lavaggi 9–12
20px-Flag of Switzerland Jean-Denis Délétraz 13–14
17 22px-Flag of Italy Andrea Montermini All
22px-Flag of France Larrousse FordTemplate:Ref Larrousse LH95 Ford G 19 22px-Flag of France Christophe Bouchut None 22px-Flag of France Éric Bernard
22px-Flag of France Emmanuel Collard
22px-Flag of France Eric Hélary
22px-Flag of Spain Elton Julian
20 22px-Flag of France Érik Comas None
22px-Flag of Italy Parmalat Forti Ford Forti FG01 Ford EDD 3.0 V8 G 21 25px-Brazilflag Pedro Diniz All n/a
22 25px-Brazilflag Roberto Moreno All
22px-Flag of Italy Minardi Scuderia Italia Minardi M195 Ford EDM 3.0 V8 G 23 22px-Flag of Italy Pierluigi Martini 1–9 22px-Flag of Italy Giancarlo Fisichella[23]
22px-Flag of Portugal Pedro Lamy 10–17
24 22px-Flag of Italy Luca Badoer All
22px-Flag of France Ligier Gitanes Blondes Ligier JS41 Mugen-Honda MF-301 3.0 V10 G 25 Flag-of-japansmall Aguri Suzuki 1–3, 9, 15–16 22px-Flag of France Franck Lagorce[25]
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Martin Brundle 4–8, 10–14, 17
26 22px-Flag of France Olivier Panis All
22px-Flag of Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA Ferrari 412T2 Ferrari 044/1 3.0 V12 G 27 22px-Flag of France Jean Alesi All 22px-Flag of Italy Nicola Larini[23]
28 22px-Flag of Austria Gerhard Berger All
20px-Flag of Switzerland Red Bull Sauber Ford Sauber C14 Ford ECA Zetec-R 3.0 V8 G 29 22px-Flag of Austria Karl Wendlinger 1–4, 16–17 25px-ARGENntina Norberto Fontana[23]
22px-Flag of France Jean-Christophe Boullion 5–15
30 Flag of Germany Heinz-Harald Frentzen All

Team changes Edit

At the end of the 1994 season, the famous Lotus name disappeared from the grid along with Larrousse, with Forti entering the fray. Minardi had been expected to run with Mugen-Honda engines, but at the last minute, Ligier boss Flavio Briatore persuaded the Japanese engine supplier to supply Ligier, leaving Minardi in a mess.

The status of Ligier and who its owners were was coming under scrutiny. The news that Martin Brundle had signed with them for 1995 brought up rumours that Tom Walkinshaw was the new boss of the team. Walkinshaw's move to Ligier is part of the deal hammered out last year by Flavio Briatore and FIA's Max Mosley to get Benetton off the hook for the use of an illegal fuel filter in the 1994 German Grand Prix. Briatore appeared to have asked Walkinshaw to control Ligier.[15]

Driver changes Edit

At the start of the seasonEdit

During the seasonEdit

Calendar Edit

The Pacific Grand Prix, originally scheduled for 16 April, was moved to 22 October due to the effects of the Great Hanshin earthquake.

Round Grand Prix Date Location
1 Brazilian Grand Prix 26 March 25px-Brazilflag Autódromo José Carlos Pace
2 Argentine Grand Prix 9 April 25px-ARGENntina Autódromo Oscar Alfredo Gálvez
3 San Marino Grand Prix 30 April 22px-Flag of San Marino.svg-1- Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari
4 Spanish Grand Prix 14 May 22px-Flag of Spain Circuit de Catalunya
5 Monaco Grand Prix 28 May 25px-Monacoflag Circuit de Monaco
6 Canadian Grand Prix 11 June 25px-Canadaflag Circuit Gilles Villeneuve
7 French Grand Prix 2 July 22px-Flag of France Circuit de Nevers Magny-Cours
8 British Grand Prix 16 July 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Silverstone Circuit
9 German Grand Prix 30 July Flag of Germany Hockenheimring
10 Hungarian Grand Prix 13 August 22px-Flag of Hungary Hungaroring
11 Belgian Grand Prix 27 August 22px-Flag of Belgium (civil) Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps
12 Italian Grand Prix 10 September 22px-Flag of Italy Autodromo Nazionale Monza
13 Portuguese Grand Prix 24 September 22px-Flag of Portugal Autódromo do Estoril
14 European Grand Prix 1 October Flag of Germany Nürburgring
15 Pacific Grand Prix 22 October Flag-of-japansmall TI Circuit Aida
16 Japanese Grand Prix 29 October Flag-of-japansmall Suzuka Circuit
17 Australian Grand Prix 12 November 25px-AustraliaFLAG Adelaide Street Circuit

Results and Standings Edit

Grands PrixEdit

Round Grand Prix Pole Position Fastest Lap Winning Driver Winning Constructor Report
1 Brazilian Grand Prix 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
2 Argentine Grand Prix 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom David Coulthard Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Williams-Renault Report
3 San Marino Grand Prix Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 22px-Flag of Austria Gerhard Berger 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Williams-Renault Report
4 Spanish Grand Prix Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
5 Monaco Grand Prix 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill 22px-Flag of France Jean Alesi Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
6 Canadian Grand Prix Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 22px-Flag of France Jean Alesi 22px-Flag of Italy Ferrari Report
7 French Grand Prix 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
8 British Grand Prix 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Johnny Herbert 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
9 German Grand Prix 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
10 Hungarian Grand Prix 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Williams-Renault Report
11 Belgian Grand Prix 22px-Flag of Austria Gerhard Berger 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom David Coulthard Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
12 Italian Grand Prix 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom David Coulthard 22px-Flag of Austria Gerhard Berger 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Johnny Herbert 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
13 Portuguese Grand Prix 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom David Coulthard 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom David Coulthard 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom David Coulthard 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Williams-Renault Report
14 European Grand Prix 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom David Coulthard Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
15 Pacific Grand Prix 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom David Coulthard Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
16 Japanese Grand Prix Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
17 Australian Grand Prix 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Williams-Renault Report

DriversEdit

Pos Driver BRA
25px-Brazilflag
ARG
25px-ARGENntina
SMR
22px-Flag of San Marino.svg-1-
ESP
22px-Flag of Spain
MON
25px-Monacoflag
CAN
25px-Canadaflag
FRA
22px-Flag of France
GBR
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom
GER
Flag of Germany
HUN
22px-Flag of Hungary
BEL
22px-Flag of Belgium (civil)
ITA
22px-Flag of Italy
POR
22px-Flag of Portugal
EUR
Flag of Germany
PAC
Flag-of-japansmall
JPN
Flag-of-japansmall
AUS
25px-AustraliaFLAG
Points
1 Flag of Germany Michael Schumacher 1 3 Ret 1 1 5 1 Ret 1 11 1 Ret 2 1 1 1 Ret 102
2 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Damon Hill Ret 1 1 4 2 Ret 2 Ret Ret 1 2 Ret 3 Ret 3 Ret 1 69
3 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom David Coulthard 2 Ret 4 Ret Ret Ret 3 3 2 2 Ret Ret 1 3 2 Ret Ret 49
4 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Johnny Herbert Ret 4 7 2 4 Ret Ret 1 4 4 7 1 7 5 6 3 Ret 45
5 22px-Flag of France Jean Alesi 5 2 2 Ret Ret 1 5 2 Ret Ret Ret Ret 5 2 5 Ret Ret 42
6 22px-Flag of Austria Gerhard Berger 3 6 3 3 3 11 12 Ret 3 3 Ret Ret 4 Ret 4 Ret Ret 31
7 22px-Flag of Finland Mika Häkkinen 4 Ret 5 Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret Ret Ret Ret 2 Ret 8 2 DNS 17
8 22px-Flag of France Olivier Panis Ret 7 9 6 Ret 4 8 4 Ret 6 9 Ret Ret Ret 8 5 2 16
9 Flag of Germany Heinz-Harald Frentzen Ret 5 6 8 6 Ret 10 6 Ret 5 4 3 6 Ret 7 8 Ret 15
10 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Mark Blundell 6 Ret 5 Ret 11 5 Ret Ret 5 4 9 Ret 9 7 4 13
11 25px-Brazilflag Rubens Barrichello Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret 2 6 11 Ret 7 6 Ret 11 4 Ret Ret Ret 11
12 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Eddie Irvine Ret Ret 8 5 Ret 3 9 Ret 9 13 Ret Ret 10 6 11 4 Ret 10
13 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Martin Brundle 9 Ret 10 4 Ret Ret 3 Ret 8 7 Ret 7
14 22px-Flag of Italy Gianni Morbidelli Ret Ret 13 11 9 6 14 Ret Ret 3 5
15 22px-Flag of Finland Mika Salo 7 Ret Ret 10 Ret 7 15 8 Ret Ret 8 5 13 10 12 6 5 5
16 22px-Flag of France Jean-Christophe Boullion 8 Ret Ret 9 5 10 11 6 12 Ret Ret 3
17 Flag-of-japansmall Aguri Suzuki 8 Ret 11 6 Ret DNS 1
18 22px-Flag of Portugal Pedro Lamy 9 10 Ret Ret 9 13 11 6 1
22px-Flag of Italy Pierluigi Martini Ret Ret 12 14 7 Ret Ret 7 Ret 0
Flag-of-japansmall Ukyo Katayama Ret 8 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret Ret 10 Ret 14 Ret Ret 0
25px-Brazilflag Pedro Diniz 10 NC 15 Ret 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 13 9 16 13 17 Ret 7 0
22px-Flag of Italy Massimiliano Papis Ret Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret 12 0
22px-Flag of Italy Luca Badoer Ret DNS 14 Ret Ret 8 13 10 Ret 8 Ret Ret 14 11 15 9 DNS 0
Flag-of-japansmall Taki Inoue Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 9 Ret Ret Ret Ret 12 8 15 Ret Ret 12 Ret 0
22px-Flag of Italy Andrea Montermini 9 Ret Ret DNS DSQ Ret NC Ret 8 12 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 0
22px-Flag of France Bertrand Gachot Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 12 Ret Ret 8 0
22px-Flag of Italy Domenico Schiattarella Ret 9 Ret 15 DNS 0
22px-Flag of Austria Karl Wendlinger Ret Ret Ret 13 10 Ret 0
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Nigel Mansell 10 Ret 0
22px-Flag of Denmark Jan Magnussen 10 0
22px-Flag of the Netherlands Jos Verstappen Ret Ret Ret 12 DNS 0
25px-Brazilflag Roberto Moreno Ret NC 16 Ret Ret Ret 16 Ret Ret Ret 14 Ret 17 Ret 16 Ret Ret 0
22px-Flag of Italy Gabriele Tarquini 14 0
20px-Flag of Switzerland Jean-Denis Délétraz Ret 15 0
22px-Flag of Italy Giovanni Lavaggi Ret Ret Ret Ret 0
Pos Driver BRA
25px-Brazilflag
ARG
25px-ARGENntina
SMR
22px-Flag of San Marino.svg-1-
ESP
22px-Flag of Spain
MON
25px-Monacoflag
CAN
25px-Canadaflag
FRA
22px-Flag of France
GBR
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom
GER
Flag of Germany
HUN
22px-Flag of Hungary
BEL
22px-Flag of Belgium (civil)
ITA
22px-Flag of Italy
POR
22px-Flag of Portugal
EUR
Flag of Germany
PAC
Flag-of-japansmall
JPN
Flag-of-japansmall
AUS
25px-AustraliaFLAG
Points
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish, inc. non-classified finish
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Red Did not qualify (DNQ)
Black Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Light blue Practiced only (PO)
Friday test driver (TD) - 2003-2007 only
Blank Did not practice (DNP)
Injured or ill (Inj)
Excluded (EX)
Did not arrive (DNA)


Bold – Pole
Italics – Fastest lap

Template:Sup Drivers did not finish the Grand Prix, but were classified as they completed over 90% of the race distance.

ConstructorsEdit

Pos Constructor Car
no.
BRA
25px-Brazilflag
ARG
25px-ARGENntina
SMR
22px-Flag of San Marino.svg-1-
ESP
22px-Flag of Spain
MON
25px-Monacoflag
CAN
25px-Canadaflag
FRA
22px-Flag of France
GBR
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom
GER
Flag of Germany
HUN
22px-Flag of Hungary
BEL
22px-Flag of Belgium (civil)
ITA
22px-Flag of Italy
POR
22px-Flag of Portugal
EUR
Flag of Germany
PAC
Flag-of-japansmall
JPN
Flag-of-japansmall
AUS
25px-AustraliaFLAG
Points
1 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Benetton-Renault 1 1 3 Ret 1 1 5 1 Ret 1 11 1 Ret 2 1 1 1 Ret 137
2 Ret 4 7 2 4 Ret Ret 1 4 4 7 1 7 5 6 3 Ret
2 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Williams-Renault 5 Ret 1 1 4 2 Ret 2 Ret Ret 1 2 Ret 3 Ret 3 Ret 1 112
6 2 Ret 4 Ret Ret Ret 3 3 2 2 Ret Ret 1 3 2 Ret Ret
3 22px-Flag of Italy Ferrari 27 5 2 2 Ret Ret 1 5 2 Ret Ret Ret Ret 5 2 5 Ret Ret 73
28 3 6 3 3 3 11 12 Ret 3 3 Ret Ret 4 Ret 4 Ret Ret
4 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom McLaren-Mercedes 7 4 Ret 5 Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret Ret Ret Ret 2 Ret 8 10 2 DNS 30
8 6 Ret 10 Ret 5 Ret 11 5 Ret Ret 5 4 9 Ret 9 7 4
5 22px-Flag of France Ligier-Mugen-Honda 25 8 Ret 11 9 Ret 10 4 Ret 6 Ret 3 Ret 8 7 Ret DNS Ret 24
26 Ret 7 9 6 Ret 4 8 4 Ret 6 9 Ret Ret Ret 8 5 2
6 22px-Flag of Ireland Jordan-Peugeot 14 Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret 2 6 11 Ret 7 6 Ret 11 4 Ret Ret Ret 21
15 Ret Ret 8 5 Ret 3 9 Ret 9 13 Ret Ret 10 6 11 4 Ret
7 20px-Flag of Switzerland Sauber-Ford 29 Ret Ret Ret 13 8 Ret Ret 9 5 10 11 6 12 Ret Ret 10 Ret 18
30 Ret 5 6 8 6 Ret 10 6 Ret 5 4 3 6 Ret 7 8 Ret
8 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Footwork-Hart 9 Ret Ret 13 11 9 6 14 Ret Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret 12 Ret Ret 3 5
10 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 9 Ret Ret Ret Ret 12 8 15 Ret Ret 12 Ret
9 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Tyrrell-Yamaha 3 Ret 8 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret Ret 10 Ret 14 14 Ret Ret 5
4 7 Ret Ret 10 Ret 7 15 8 Ret Ret 8 5 13 10 12 6 5
10 22px-Flag of Italy Minardi-Ford 23 Ret Ret 12 14 7 Ret Ret 7 Ret 9 10 Ret Ret 9 13 11 6 1
24 Ret DNS 14 Ret Ret 8 13 10 Ret 8 Ret Ret 14 11 15 9 DNS
22px-Flag of Italy Forti-Ford 21 10 NC 15 Ret 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 13 9 16 13 17 Ret 7 0
22 Ret NC 16 Ret Ret Ret 16 Ret Ret Ret 14 Ret 17 Ret 16 Ret Ret
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Pacific-Ford 16 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 12 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 15 Ret Ret 8 0
17 9 Ret Ret DNS DSQ Ret NC Ret 8 12 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom Simtek-Ford 11 Ret Ret Ret 12 DNS 0
12 Ret 9 Ret 15 DNS
Pos Constructor Car
no.
BRA
25px-Brazilflag
ARG
25px-ARGENntina
SMR
22px-Flag of San Marino.svg-1-
ESP
22px-Flag of Spain
MON
25px-Monacoflag
CAN
25px-Canadaflag
FRA
22px-Flag of France
GBR
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom
GER
Flag of Germany
HUN
22px-Flag of Hungary
BEL
22px-Flag of Belgium (civil)
ITA
22px-Flag of Italy
POR
22px-Flag of Portugal
EUR
Flag of Germany
PAC
Flag-of-japansmall
JPN
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AUS
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Points

Note: Benetton Renault and Williams Renault were not awarded Constructors Championship points for their placings in the Brazilian Grand Prix as the cars were deemed to be using illegal fuel.

External linksEdit

FootnotesEdit

  1. "Doubts over dates" GrandPrix. Retrieved 9 March 2007
  2. "Formula 1 calendar rethink" GrandPrix. Retrieved 10 March 2007
  3. "Press Release: 1995 FIA Formula One World Championship Entry List". Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (fia.com). 1995-03-24. http://www.fia.com/resources/documents/249180022__24_03_1995_F1_Entry_95.pdf. Retrieved 2009-04-14. 
  4. Murray Walker (Commentators). (1995-03-26). Grand Prix: Brazil. [Television production]. London, England: BBC. Event occurs at 17:15–17:45. 
  5. "Larrousse to miss opening GPs". GrandPrix.com. Inside F1. 1995-03-20. http://www.grandprix.com/ns/ns00061.html. Retrieved 2009-04-15. 
  6. "Larrousse goes to the wall". GrandPrix.com. Inside F1. 1995-04-24. http://www.grandprix.com/ns/ns00102.html. Retrieved 2009-05-22. 
  7. "Larrousse: a deal with DAMS?". GrandPrix.com. Inside F1. 1995-01-30. http://www.grandprix.com/ns/ns00004.html. Retrieved 2007-03-09. 
  8. "arrousse-DAMS – on or off?". GrandPrix.com. Inside F1. 1995-02-13. http://www.grandprix.com/ns/ns00017.html. Retrieved 2007-03-17. 
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 Henry, Alan (1995) [1995]. "1995 Grands Prix: Brazilian Grand Prix". Autocourse 1995–96. Hazleton Publishing. pp. 90. 
  10. Domenjoz, Luc (1995). "The 17 Grand Prix – Grande Prêmio do Brasil". Formula 1 Yearbook 1995. Chronosports Editeur. p. 83. 
  11. 11.0 11.1 Henry, Alan (1995). "1995 Grands Prix: Brazilian Grand Prix". Autocourse 1995–96. Hazleton Publishing. pp. 86. 
  12. Henry, Alan (1995) [1995]. "1995 Grands Prix: Brazilian Grand Prix". Autocourse 1995–96. Hazleton Publishing. pp. 88. 
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 Henry, Alan (1995) [1995]. "1995 Grands Prix: Brazilian Grand Prix". Autocourse 1995–96. Hazleton Publishing. pp. 87. 
  14. 15.0 15.1 15.2 "Brundle returns to Ligier" GrandPrix. Retrieved 10 March 2007
  15. "When is a Benetton not a Benetton?". GrandPrix.com. Inside F1. 1995-03-13. http://www.grandprix.com/ns/ns00052.html. Retrieved 2009-04-11. 
  16. Hilton, Christopher (2006) [2006]. Michael Schumacher: The Whole Story. Haynes Publishing. pp. 157–163. 
  17. Domenjoz, Luc (1995). "The 17 Grand Prix – Grande Prêmio do Brasil". Formula 1 Yearbook 1995. Chronosports Editeur. p. 76. 
  18. "F1 updates its refuelling equipment". GrandPrix.com. Inside F1. 1995-03-13. http://www.grandprix.com/ns/ns00054.html. Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  19. "More worries over refueling". GrandPrix.com. Inside F1. 1995-03-27. http://www.grandprix.com/ns/ns00074.html. Retrieved 2009-04-21. 
  20. Watkins, Prof. Sid (1996). Life at the limit. Pan. pp. 154. 
  21. 22.0 22.1 Henry, Alan (1995). "Team-by-Team Review". Autocourse 1995–96. Hazleton Publishing. pp. 42–81. 
  22. 23.0 23.1 23.2 23.3 23.4 23.5 23.6 Henry, Alan (1995). "1995 Brazilian Grand Prix". Autocourse 1995–96. Hazleton Publishing. pp. 86–87. 
  23. Henry, Alan (1995). "1995 European Grand Prix". Autocourse 1995–96. Hazleton Publishing. pp. 204. 
  24. "Brundle returns to Ligier". GrandPrix.com. Inside F1. 1995-01-30. http://grandprix.com/ns/ns00002.html. Retrieved 2009-04-08. 
  25. "Pacific loses Salo" GrandPrix. Retrieved 17 March 2007
  26. "Tyrrell unveils 1995 package" GrandPrix. Retrieved 17 March 2007
  27. 28.0 28.1 "Mansell en route to McLaren" GrandPrix. Retrieved 10 March 2007
  28. "McLaren confirms Mansell" GrandPrix. Retrieved 10 March 2007
  29. "Who goes where in 1995" GrandPrix. Retrieved 16 March 2007
  30. "Verstappen signs for Simtek" GrandPrix. Retrieved 17 March 2007
  31. "Forti – getting ready for action" GrandPrix. Retrieved 10 March 2007

LinksEdit

Formula One World Championship seasons

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Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses some content from Wikipedia. The original article was at 1995 Formula One season. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Autopedia, the text of Wikipedia is available under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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